Department of Kinesiology

School of Health and Human Sciences

News and Events

Dr. Mindy Smith, a 2019 EdD in KIN graduate, recently published her dissertation. Mindy is currently an Assistant Professor in Applied Health Science and Director of Student Wellness at Messiah College. Mindy, along with her faculty mentors Dr. Diane Gill and Dr. Erin Reifsteck, published in the Journal – Case Studies in Applied Sport and Exercise Psychology. The paper is titled, “An Intervention to Support Collegiate Student-Athletes in the Transition to Meaningful Lifetime Physical Activity.” Here is the link to the article on Human Kinetics. 

Congrats Mindy! We love to see our EdD in KIN graduates continuing their work after graduating with their degree. For more information on the EdD in KIN program please visit here

A few weeks ago we kicked off our first monthly EdD in KIN virtual social event for the 2020-2021 academic year.  As we all know, it is hard to stay connected with others in the current climate. We wanted to offer something lighthearted and fun for students and alumni to take a break and connect. This first event was “EdD Trivia Night,” which was organized and hosted by Jene’ Baclawski, a member of the 2018 cohort. After introductions and some time to “mingle,”  students were randomly assigned to three teams to play four rounds of trivia: popular culture, adventures around the world, the kitchen sink, and UNCG EdD in KIN facts. After each round students were sent to their breakout rooms to discuss their ideas and submit their team answers using Google forms.  

There was lots of laughter as Jene’ offered entertaining commentary as the MC. It was a great time for students to connect with one another, especially students from other cohorts and alumni. Some of the players had their children and pets in the background which helped the event feel more casual and open. Overall the event was a hit!

A student reflected that “the opportunity to chat with new people who have gone through or are going through a similar experience” was great. We appreciate Jene’ organizing and leading the social event. Attendees offered a few shoutouts to Jené for her effort and creativity: “Excellent work, Jene! Your thoughtful and playful attitude during the event made it really fun.” 

Thanks for all your efforts in putting together this event Jene’! EdD students and alumni should keep an eye out for the October event coming soon – the EdD graduate assistants will be planning and hosting this event. If students or alumni have ideas or want to help host a future event, please contact us at eddkin@uncg.edu.  

Dr. Jason Suby, a 2019 graduate of the EdD in KIN program, recently presented his dissertation research virtually at the SHAPE America National Convention. Jason was originally accepted to present orally at the conference, but due to COVID-19, SHAPE asked presenters to provide an oral PowerPoint presentation that could be viewed virtually and widely disseminated. 

The presentation titled, “Effective Use and Implementation of Video Modeling in a Survival Swimming Course” is freely available to everyone. Please follow this link to view the presentation on SHAPE America’s website or this link to view on YouTube. 

In addition, Jason and his colleagues collaborated on an additional oral presentation that was set to be an oral presentation at the National Convention, but was then turned into a “Peer-to-Peer Teacher Professional Development” webinar. This is free to all members, but non-members must pay. See the webinar here. Congrats Jason! For more information on his research you can reach out to Dr. Suby directly at jason.suby@westpoint.edu. To return to the EdD in KIN web-page click here.

Dr. DeAnne Brooks held a “Scholar Strike for Racial Justice” on September 9, 2020 for Kinesiology students, faculty, and staff. She used the article “The Way We Never Were: Postracial Kinesiology in America” (Smith & Jamieson, 2017) to guide the discussion. Thank you, Dr. Brooks, for a very insightful session!

Dr. Brooks leading a Zoom session 9/9/2020 on race in Kinesiology.
Dr. Brooks leading a Zoom session 9/9/2020 on race in Kinesiology.

Following EdD in KIN tradition, our 7th cohort of doctorate students participated in orientation in June. However, things were a bit different this year. Given the current circumstances we welcomed the 2020 cohort to the UNC Greenboro community via Zoom instead of in person. The students were greeted by a panel of distinguished guests, faculty, and alumni to learn more about what to expect out of their EdD in KIN experience. The orientation addressed important issues for student success such as the use of technology, the challenges of balancing education along with career and family obligations, best practices and helpful hints, along with how to successfully and adequately navigate online courses. The orientation culminated with a social, via Zoom, led by the 2017 EdD cohort.

The new cohort was happy with their experiences during the orientation at UNCG and excited about classes this fall. Here are some of the things they had to say:

  • “Thank you! While I was so looking forward to meeting on campus, I am glad we had a well organized alternative plan.”
  • “I feel much better about what to expect as I proceed with the EdD KIN program.”
  • “I really enjoyed this experience! Thank you so much. It really helped me feel like I was part of the program already, and I’m so excited to begin! I only wish it could have been in person, but this was such a great alternative.”

Despite the challenges of creating a sense community for our newest cohort via Zoom instead of in person, orientation was a success! Students were able to develop a strong sense of community to help carry them through their four years of being an online doctoral student. In other efforts, the 2018 cohort is planning a “Taco Tuesday” and Bingo Night to continue this connection between and among EdD cohorts. We look forward to welcoming these students to campus as soon as the opportunity arises.  

Applications for the fall 2021 academic year are now being accepted. Our review of applications for admissions will begin mid-January of 2021. For more information on the program, click here or contact us at eddkin@uncg.edu.

The summer has been busy for the EdD in KIN students, faculty, and staff. Numerous students from various cohorts shared their dissertation research with the UNCG community via Zoom. We had 16 students successfully defend their dissertations and 19 students propose their dissertations.

Our 2016 EdD in KIN cohort, as part of their 4th year, defended their dissertations. Some of the very exciting defense topics that our students defended included:

  • Intramural PA program and Middle School student attendance
  • Perceived Health of Former Division I Women’s College Soccer Players
  • Patient-Rated Outcome Measures in Athletic Training: An Exploratory Study
  • Can We Play Outside? Social-Emotional Learning and Preschooler Physical Activity during Outdoor Play.

These students have put in tremendous effort to complete these projects. We are excited to see how they all continue to use these projects to make a real impact in their individual settings.

Our 2017 EdD in KIN cohort, as part of their 3rd year, proposed their dissertation topics. Some of the very exciting proposal topics that our students presented included:

  • High Performance Sport Management in the National Basketball Association and its Impact on Player Health
  • Educational Programing for Parents to address Sport Specialization and Related Injury
  • An Exploratory Study on Factors that Impact Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder’s Physical Activity
  • Faculty Perceptions of Online Education in Kinesiology Field: A Qualitative Study

These students will be using this academic year, their 4th and final year, to conduct their various projects and collect data. We look forward to seeing their project unfold and defend their dissertations, ultimately then walking across that stage as official doctors. Keep up the hard work, 2017 cohort!

Congratulations to all of our students who have put so much effort into their dissertation work.

While we are sad that we could not have welcomed you to campus for your defenses and proposals, we hope that we will be able to welcome both cohorts back on campus soon!

Recently Black UNC Greensboro faculty wrote a letter to Black students at UNCG. They shared, “We write to you all as Black faculty members that feel called to address the utter outrage, grief, and despair that is present in the ongoing police and state violence against Black people. We see you and we are with each and every one of you.” Listed as authors of this letter include EdD in KIN faculty Dr. Michael Hemphill and KIN faculty Dr. Deanne Brooks, who is also an EdD in KIN alumna. The EdD in KIN program stands behind and supports the letter written by Black UNCG faculty to Black UNCG students. To read the letter in its entirety please click here.

The Department of Kinesiology at UNCG would like to share a statement with our community related to recent events. We are shaken by the recent deaths of Rayshard Brooks, George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor — the latest public atrocities added to the more than 400-year history of relentless oppression faced by Black people. The recent citizen protests against anti-Black racism and brutality in law enforcement and in support of the Black Lives Matter movement highlight an urgent need for all institutions to stand up and advocate for social justice. The faculty and staff of the Department of Kinesiology acknowledge that systemic racism and racist policies affect all aspects of our society and recognize the need for broad change. We are committed to making change happen through our teaching, service, research, and community engagement. 

Our first step in creating change is for our faculty and staff to reexamine our practices and policies to identify any weaknesses and challenges. We will work relentlessly to improve as professionals and build a safe space for all our students to learn. We plan to make real change by interrogating how our own positions as teachers, researchers, friends, or family members impact those around us. Our faculty and staff will have a forum to regularly discuss how our actions and words can counter systemic racism, racist policies, and discrimination. We will begin this summer by using the book “How to be an Antiracist” by eminent historian Ibram X. Kendi as a conduit to advance our knowledge, understanding, and ability to promote antiracist thoughts, words, and action. This first step will lay a strong foundation for us to build our future strategic plan premised on dismantling systemic racism, racist policies, and discrimination within our UNCG community.

We assert that our department values inclusivity, equity, and equal opportunity for all. As faculty and staff, our immediate goal is to ensure that all of our students feel safe and valued in our Kinesiology classrooms. We also recognize that racism is systemic, built into institutions, and woven deeply into society’s consciousness. It is persistent and often implicit. We are seeing its effects in the much higher impact that the COVID-19 pandemic is having on Black people as well as generally disproportionate health disparities that have long plagued the United States. As citizens and Kinesiologists, we are responsible for addressing and rectifying these realities. 

The department’s leadership is working to develop a long-term plan for Kinesiology to counter systemic racism. We are also taking the following actions to promote immediate change:

  1. Through self-reflection and candid discussions, we will identify concerns in our teaching practices or communications, and develop action steps to improve. 
  2. We will intertwine our actions with the university’s values on diversity and inclusivity to demonstrate that our actions will speak louder than our words.
  3. We will continue to critically reflect and interrogate our instructional, research, service, and community-engaged programs to identify and overcome any overt or covert systemic racism. 

In our second step, we will create a faculty, staff, student, and alumni committee to:

  1. Act as a forum for public discussions to confirm our progress over time.
  2. Design a plan to identify weaknesses/vulnerabilities in addressing systemic racism in our department and in the field of Kinesiology. 

In these plans, the faculty, staff, students, and alumni are partners and teammates. We will rely on one another to fight the same fight and make changes to achieve our goals related to anti-racism. Our faculty, staff, students, and alumni are change agents and have the ability to advocate for human rights and responsibilities. 

The faculty and staff know that our duty is to communicate our values to students and alumni. It is critically important that the students and the public know the stance of our faculty and staff on systemic racism and our commitment to create and maintain a safe and socially just learning environment in which all students regardless of gender, gender identity, race, social-economic status, sexual orientation, religion, culture, or disability can feel welcome and valued, and succeed in pursuing their personal goals. We aim to create and maintain an inclusive environment that will help everyone feel supported in fighting against systemic racism, racist policies, and discrimination. We will produce immediate change and develop a dynamic and fluid action plan toward these goals. We value the support from our students and alumni, and look forward to working together to create change.

Sincerely,
The Department of Kinesiology at UNCG

Published June 25, 2020

In recognition of Juneteenth, the Department of Kinesiology at UNCG would like to share a statement with our community related to recent events.

We are shaken by the recent deaths of Rayshard Brooks, George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor — the latest public atrocities added to the more than 400-year history of relentless oppression faced by Black people. The recent citizen protests against anti-Black racism and brutality in law enforcement and in support of the Black Lives Matter movement highlight an urgent need for all institutions to stand up and advocate for social justice.

The faculty and staff of the Department of Kinesiology acknowledge that systemic racism and racist policies affect all aspects of our society and recognize the need for broad change. We are committed to making change happen through our teaching, service, research, and community engagement. We recognize that this is a fluid and evolving situation, and we look forward to sharing a more thorough statement and action plan in the near future.

In these times of uncertainty and unrest, we have continued to operate under our “business as usual” mode…however, we realize that it is important to pause and take time to affirm that we will not tolerate racism in our country.  We are eager to find ways to ensure that our students know that we care and are looking for ways to support the “shared fate” that our Chancellor, Frank Gilliam, has referred to each time he addresses the UNCG community.  In his recent Message from the Chancellor shared May 31, 2020 in response to the death of George Floyd and others, he asked the question “Are we willing to buy into the notion that we have a ‘shared fate’ regardless of race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or party affiliation? Are people willing to change how institutions work in this country so that all people are treated fairly?”   I hope that all of you (faculty, staff, students, alumni, friends) will join us in coming together, as stated by the Chancellor, with a “good heart and common sense to solve problems” and find ways to counter systemic racism, particularly anti-Black racism that has been clearly demonstrated in the past few weeks.  Let us all join together to create change.  The EdD in Kinesiology program strives to develop leaders who can make an impact not just in kinesiology, but in their communities.  This is a perfect time for us to focus on how we can be agents of change and focus on antiracism and social justice – let’s be leaders and help find ways to create a society that is inclusive of all. We will be reaching out to all of you to join us in moving forward.

The EdD in Kinesiology Faculty – Dr. Pam K. Brown, Dr. Diane Gill, Dr. Erin Reifsteck, Dr. Michael Hemphill & Dr. Ben Dyson 

Resources: The National Museum of African American History & Culture, Smithsonian offers an overview of anti-racism, including a video clip by Ibram X. Kendi, the author of “How to be an Antiracist.” – check out the site. The Alberta Civil Liberties Research Centre also offers information about anti-racism, including what it means and how it is an active stance, along with information about their human rights programs and resources.